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Discussion Starter #1
So I decided to try it on Chloe and so purchased one on Friday.... I did try it on myself (as did Kodi before putting one of Rhett) and it was a bit shocking.... not painfull in anyway, but slightly alarming, made me jump for a split second....
I finally used it when Chloe started whining a little when I left home today (only for 2 hours), so I got back inside and strapped it on her. She was kinda shocked at first, and didn't know what to do with this thing on her neck. I left and could hear her cry a little more and than her cry turned into a bark. The second bark she suddenly got quiet. A few seconds later, another bark and quiet.... after that I don't think she made a sound.

When I got home though, my blanket was all over the floor (not torn thank god).... I guess she doesn't get mad, but even!!! hehe
 

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I've wondered for several years how effective these collars are. Our Traveler barks so much that it gets nerve wracking. /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/frown.gif The shock part has always put me off, but it sounds like that's not too bad. Please let us know if it continues to work.
 

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It looks like you got some great results with the collar. Like Sandy, I've always been concerned about the shock part. Keep us updated on how things go with it.
 

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We have one remote control collar. It does not automatically go off if they bark - we control it. That way it can be used for other naughty behaviors as well. The only down side is that if we are not home, then they can bay and bark all they want and get away with it.

We have found these collars to be wonderful. Ours has a beep and a shock button. We always pre-warn the dogs with a beep before they get shocked.

The shock level required varies between dogs. While one uses a level 4, another one requires a level 6, and the third one bounces. There are 10 levels of shock. After one or two shocks they learn pretty quickly that if they hear the beep they are in for it should they continue what they are doing. So now it only requires a beep most of the time (not the shock) to get them distracted and moving onto some different activity.

What we need now though are some dummy collars. See with 4 dogs, 3 of which alternate using the one collar, it would be helpful to have more. All we have to do to change their behavior is put the collar on them for the most part and they immediately seem to remember what it does so they stay on their best behavior. Who needs to shock them. :hi:
 

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I used it on Charlie before, I'm the one who gave up on it because he gave me that sad look when I put it on. /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/frown.gif
The store clerk explained that it shouldn't hurt them, it is like a static shock you get when you get clothes out from the dryer. The frequency is the louder they bark the higher the frequency it is. Charlie learned how to get around it, still barked very loud with it on! :eyes:
It is not cheap, over $60 and the batteries is expensive!
Sorry neighbors, I let him loose now, so far no complain. He doesn't bark very often only when he hears a dog walks by our fence.
 

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Eleanor...

So glad that you may have found a solution to this "situation".

We use the invisible fence which also has collars that have audible warning noises then if the noise is not heeded, there is a "zap". In all of our dogs' cases, with the exception of my deceased beetle-mix, Jake, we could not complete the training because after one zap, we could not drag them back to the fence. Incidentally, the training was awful. /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/frown.gif

Anyway, they wear the collars and most of the time the batteries are not even working but the presence of the collar is enough to keep them from crossing the fence line.

Again...glad that all seems OK.

~Denise
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Chloe was wearing the collar today all day and when I got home (was almost 11 hours) she was fine - thank god. She greeted me with a waggy tail and than ran to the corner because she saw I noticed the poop pile in the corner. Poor thing, she know she is not supposed to do it inside, but couldn't help it. I took her out right after I took the collar off and she pooped again outside..... this of course was followed by a treat /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/smile.gif
 

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I had an anti-bark collar for Rosa when she was younger but it didn't give a shock instead it squirted a citronella scent that made her stop. She hated it and so did I because the spray would make her face wet so she would shake her head and that would make it go off again /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/mad.gif

Could you give me some info on this shock anti-bark collar coz I've never seen anything like that over here in the UK. I don't need one now but I'd still like to know about them. Thanks.
 

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I witnessed something funny this morning. It's a bit ironic too after having posted yesterday that I needed some extra "dummy" collars for my dogs that are not currently wearing the shock collar. This morning all 4 dogs were at the gate barking at some school children passing by so I pressed the beep sound first and figured I would follow it with the shock if necessary. All 4 heard the beep and immediately shut up. Man I love this collar. lol
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Jennifer, the collar has this little box with 2 pins (which give the shock). Basically it's not exactly an electric shock, but more like static. It comes in different levels, when the dog doesn't respond to the minimum level, it hits one level higher. The collar remembers the level that the dogs responded to and the next time will start from there. It's working great so far for me.

I was very afraid to use it first, didn't want to hurt her, but when I tried it, it was mostly alarming for a split second and not painful at all....

Chloe doesn't even minds when I put it on her, I think because she doesn't usually bark (unless in distress) and knows that nothing will happen to her, just another annoying thing on her neck for the next few hours... hehe

I think that if the dog has "issues" such as sever separation anxiety, a vet/dog therapist should be consulted prior to using this. But it sure does do the trick... :thumbup:
 

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The collar that we use has a dial with the numbers 1-10. We control what level is being used. Obviously we start with one. If that doesn't do the trick we move it up one number at a time until we see the dog react. The younger the pup, the lower the level required. (at least in my experience)

My dogs do not mind having the collar put on, but they remember what it does so it makes them behave more from the start. That is why I think the dummy collars for us would work great.

Our collar was purchased at Petco and ran us about $100 USD which seems so expensive, but it is worth every penny.
 

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They are trying to ban these in the Uk.
This is the government response:
The Government recognises that many people are concerned about electric shock collar training devices and their potential for misuse, particularly collars operated by remote hand-held controls. It is equally aware there are others who are convinced that they have a place in training animals where other methods have failed and the alternative might be worse - possibly destruction of the animal in some rare cases. There is also conflicting evidence from people professionally involved with the training and behaviour of animals as to whether these aids are effective and whether they have a harmful impact on an animal's welfare.

There are no plans at present to ban the sale and use of any electronic training aids for animals, including the 'electric shock collars'. For many years the Protection of Animals Act 1911 made it an offence to cause unnecessary suffering to a domestic or captive animal. However, the Government is not aware of any prosecutions under the 1911 Act in relation to the use or misuse of electronic training collars.

The Animal Welfare Act 2006 (AWA), which became law on 6 April in England (on 27 March in Wales), repealed and replaced the 1911 Act. The AWA provides additional powers to prohibit or ban the use of any equipment in England and Wales in relation to animals through secondary legislation if considered necessary. It also allows a prosecution to be brought where an animal, although not currently suffering, is being treated in a way that fails to meet its welfare needs.

While we are aware of a number of scientific studies on electric shock collars, Defra considers that to date those studies published in this area are not sufficiently robust and that the evidence base needs to be built on before consideration can be given to either banning or regulating their use. The government is not prepared to do this unless there is clear evidence that these devices in themselves are harmful to welfare.

Defra has recognised that further research into these types of collars is a priority and has sought to set up a suitable study. Following an unsuccessful Open Competition Call in August 2005, Defra reconsidered its position and, in July 2006, circulated a revised call for research, this time in the form of a Limited Tender Call. The call invited proposals for studies to assess the effect of specific electronic pet training aids (excluding electric fences) on the welfare of dogs. The call encouraged an epidemiological approach, which is one based on observation of collars already in use. One proposal was received in response to the call and this is currently under discussion with a view to commissioning a suitable programme of research later this year.

Defra has also asked the Companion Animal Welfare Council, advisory body to government on companion animal welfare matters, to undertake an independent study of available evidence on the use of these electronic training aids to help inform Defra policy and complement any separate research that Defra may commission.

All research into these areas commissioned by government will be put into the public domain.

Further information on the Animal Welfare Act 2006 can be found on the Defra website (new window).

On a forum I belong to the majority feel them to be barbaric and I must say that I would never ever contemplate using one. :angryfire:
 

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Greetings-

I was extrememly happy that the shock collar worked for you. I remember the first time I tested it on myself as well and it was just amusing but once I figured out the type of shock it was I was never concerned.

Though every morning I pull it out to use before I leave for the day Rhett gets all the way down and looks all sad but it's more because he knows that I'm leaving for the day. Evertime I get home though his tail is going supersonic.

Scarlett however is on borrowed time. We have new neighbors that have a dog and Rhett will go over and whine a little bit when he has his collar on. Scarlett however takes Rhetty's whine as a need to bark. I think she is still a bit small for the thing so I will wait a few more months but the collar is already purchased.
 

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Thanks to you all I started using it again. Charlie woke up early around 7:00 this morning and wanted out. I'm afraid he might wake my neighbor so I put the collar on him. hehe...no bark!
 

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We have a friend that used this type of color for a while on all his dogs. They hardly ever pull the real collar out of the drawer because they came up with an ingenious idea!

The purchased a color of the same size and taped two small batteries to it with electrical tape. The side and weight were just about the same.

The dog thinks the collar is on and no barking.
 

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I wouldn't use any form of zapping with Abby.

I also don't understand how people can say don't spank your dog to "correct" behaviour then use bark collars.
 

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I agree with Beaglebabe.

Our dogs need training with kind methods to feel secure and happy in their homes not barbaric methods of punishment to frighten them into submission.
 

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Hmmmm, this might spark a heated debate but after reading all about shock collars now I have to agree with you Vonny 100%.

Rosa was a terrible barker when I took her for a walk and I have successfully trained her to stop barking on command using positive re-inforcement with the aid of treats.

I do however understand and respect that when leaving a dog alone whilst at work who continually barks and annoys neighbours is a worrying problem.
 
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