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Mizu is 3 months..I have noticed that lately he's been really aggressive. Last night I was getting ready to take him for his nightly stroll and he started to jump up and me to bite my arms. I told him "NO MIZU!", "STOP!" and "OUCH that HURTS!" and he would not stop. It must've went on for a good 10 min. He then got a hold of my slipper and just chewed the heck out of hit. Slamming it from side to side. Usually when he has to poop he will jump at me but this was different.
Also everytime I take him out of his crate he gets all hyper crazy. He also runs these laps from the kitchen to the living room. It's like a horse in the house. Stomp stomp stomp. Last night he ran right into his crate door and just kept going. Ahhhhh
He is driving me nuts.. all he has to do is look at w/ me with those beagle eyes and I say "Oh Mizu, Why do u have to be so cute & naughty at the same time?"
 

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lol jenny

i think this is a normal beagle puppy.
that running around from room to room sure is.
thats a sign of them being wound up and happy.
bernie still does that (when hes healthy) and hes 5 yrs old. its a good thing. sounds like your pup has a bunch of energy to spend up.
life's short, play hard. :thumbup:
 

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The mad running around is known as "zoomies". They all do it. My three all zoomie round the yard with baby Gwenni bringing up the rear. I dont like the zoomie into the house and back out again.

The wind and rain maake them zoomie round even more.

Ref the biting, he is trying his luck now, you need to be consistant with dealing with it. When Gwenni bit I would say NO loudly and turn around and ignore her then make a fuss of her wwhen she is calm. You can always transfer the Bitee onto a bone or a toy instead of your hand.

Your dog is not aggressive , just pushing your buttons. Caleb as a tiny puppy was a nightmare compared to the girls, he was extremely biting and we called him the beagle shark coss he'd lunge forwards like jaws and hang off your sleeve or leg. We'd remove him and give his aa chew or a toy instead, took a while to click though.

Your pup is learning a process known as bite "inhibition" where eventually if the dogs mouthes you there is no pressure behind the bite.

A puppy can have very sharp teeth and they are like needles.

Puppies also sometimes like t0 mouth or nibble your fingers like in a loving gesture. Caleb still tries to nibble my fingers sometimes and he still sucks baby blankies. Gwenni likes to nibble fingers too but I dont try and encourage it.

Dont remove the biting pup to a crate or bed as a punishment as that is supposed to be his secure safe den not a punishment area.
 

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He sounds normal. Definitely don't let the biting go on for ten minutes. The very first time it happens, choose one thing to do (some people like to growl, or yelp, do a snout hug, or put the dog in "time-out") then ignore him until he calms down.

Start teaching him now to sit still while you put his leash on to go for a walk. It's best to work on this now, before you have a 25 pound missile of pure muscle launching himself at you.
 

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It's so easy for people to forget that beagles don't have hands or fingers with which to grab, touch or explore. They have their mouths. When Mizu grabs your arm she's doing nothing different that what a child does when she pulls on your arm and says "come on Mommy, hurry up Mommy." Both dog and child need to be corrected gently, and probably repeatedly, but neither is being aggressive, just excited/impatient.

I've always been tolerant of my dogs' desire to explore with their mouths, but I've also drawn limits. As soon as they'd start to use too much force I'd say "easy" in a strong (not loud) voice and push their face away. I do let them go right back to exploring though and repeat the "easy" command as needed. It doesn't take long for them to learn how much force is appropriate.

My border collie Muffin used to love to chase my hand under the bed clothes. She'd pounce on my moving hand as though she were after a little burrowing animal. Muffin learned to differentiate between my hand under just a sheet, and the hand under a blanket and comforter. With just the sheet she was very careful not to bite too hard, while when I had more padding she would bite harder. If it got too much a quick "easy" would get her to back the pressure down and we'd keep right on playing.
 

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I hope you learn to love the zoomies as much as I do. It's pure joy in action! :biglaugh:

Other dogs would teach Mizu manners when he acts like you described. He would understand what they mean immediately.
Humans have to communicate with dogs in the way THEY understand; learn to think like a dog; take obedience classes. Look for a reputable class. I used an obedience club in our area, whose members show their dogs regularly. It had several levels of obedience available including 'puppy kindergarten'.

Good Luck!
 

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You seem to have a typical, happy, normal ol' three month old Beagle! Full of energy and not realizing that he can't act with you the way he did with his litter mates. When Jersey would nip at us we started out by yelping like another puppy would if he did that to another dog. That only got Jersey more riled up so we learned to re-direct that energy instead. Every time she started to bite we gave her a toy so she re-directed that instinct onto a toy. It took some time, but she caught on and when she gets excited now, instead of nipping at us she goes and gets a toy. You do have to get this under control now though to keep Mizu from learning this behavior is acceptable. Obedience training at this point would be very helpful. For you more than him. It helped to have that support for the problems we were having, plus just doing the training, Jersey learned who was in charge. I had all sorts of high hopes for Jersey. She did so well in puppy class...that didn't last once we got to intermediate classes and had to master heel...we're still working on that one! LOL!
 

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The tricks I learned are very good. Before I put the leash on, Charlie needs to be very calm and "sit" command. If he gets hyper, I take back the leash, no walk(pretend). Once the leash is on, ALWAYS I lead, Charlie would sit by the opened door, "sit" "stay" command. I would take the first step out. Charlie is so used to it now, he would automatically sit by the opened door before I could say the "sit" command :biglaugh: :animal18:
 

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I've hit a brick wall with Jack and after reading all of the posts on here, I think it's my own fault. I've had dogs for 40 years but I've never had a beagle, and they are not like other dogs. I'm not enjoying having him around, and that hurts me. I haven't contained Jack to just one or two rooms but have let him have the run of the house, and it's been a nightmare. He's into something he shouldn't be all the time, and trying to get what he has in his mouth away from him is a fight. Even trying to temp him with a chew toy or treat doesn't work. I realized yesterday that I'm not enjoying having him around. Everything is a fight and I don't dare let him out of my sight. He chews and shreds everything he gets a hold of and he's biting more now then when he was teething. I need to take control but I'm not sure what my first step should be. He loves to play outside and we do a lot of that with him - he's great at fetch, so he's getting exercise but maybe not enough. I haven't tried taking him for walks yet. I wanted to have better control of him before we tried that. Help!
 

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Do you have training centers open near you, or is virtual training an option if they're closed because of COVID? Agis did a virtual class, and it went well.

Walks will give mental stimulation as well as physical, especially if you incorporate training - sit/look at me/leave it, that sort of thing (don't know what he's like with other dogs).

Until he behaves better, I wouldn't feel bad about gating off part of the house. He's...6 months? There's time for him to get better. We gate off most of our rooms, in part so they don't get into trouble (well, so Agis doesn't, and Xerxes chews wires if left alone).

Have you heard of NILIF? Nothing in life is free. It's a good way to help the dog learn your expected behaviour. There's lots of info on it out there.

You could also check out Stonnie Dennis videos on YouTube. He seems like a really smart trainer.
 

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Puppy or young beagles should not have total freedom in the house.. it takes about 3 years for them to calm down..restrict the area that is the least area for damage. It does get better. My dog is now 8.11 years and is no longer destructive. It takes a lot of patience and coming to accept this.
*At this point may I suggest you start new posts and not respond to posts that are 13 years old since those people are long gone.
 

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You desperately need to burn lots of that energy!! Jack needs to be taken on walks, or if you have a thread mill, put him on it. A Beagle needs lots of exercise to burn up that high energy. As many have said on here, I tired Beagle is a perfect Beagle. As others have suggested, teach Jack the basic commands to sit and stay. Beagles are very food oriented and will follow any command they are taught if the end result is a treat. Also, when trying to teach him to walk on a leash use treats. Reward him when he does well. Keep a short leash so his nose stays off the ground and don’t expect him to be perfect. It takes lots of patience. Don’t give up on him. He is looking for you to teach him his limits. He can read your frustration, so try hard to be patient and calm.
 

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We took Molly to a basic manners class and it was a huge help to socialize her and to teach us the correct way to train them. Beagles are wonderful, loyal dogs but they need a firm hand to guide them. Get him a good harness and a short leash to start walking. Bring super tasty treats (we use microwave hot dogs and cut them in small pieces) and reward him as he walks by your side. We've trained some tough cases because we rescue adult dogs.
 

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He must not be that easy, so in order to train him firstly stay calm and make it aside if it is safe. Do not give it attention afterwards. Instead, get it away from the incident and make up your mastery so they can realize that the aggression was bad. But keep it in mind that do not yell or use physical punishment
 
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