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A few days I posted a question about getting another Beagle and the likelihood of him being another beagler. I saw lots of great responses all with different takes on the issue. For some, their dogs bay rarely and for others like us, it's above average.

Also, let me clarify, I'm not talking barking, that's completely different then beagling or baying. Barking is behavioral, baying is instinctive. It's the beagling that I want to avoid or at the very least not be a prominent trait if we get another beagle.

One of the interesting points beagletails made was her observation that beagles with a Field Trail lineage bay more then others. Which makes sense. So if we did get another beagle we would stay away from Field Trail beagles due to the increased likelihood of the baying.

So my question is this, when talking to breeders or looking at lineage how will we be able to identify more of a pet beagle? Is there a certain trait specialty in the lineage we should look for that might be more suitable. Kinda like there are Field Trail Beagle, what other types of beagles are there?
 

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My first beagle, Benny, had begun training in rabbit hunting before I adopted him. He was a major bayer if he caught a scent. I adopted Molly from the shelter and I think for the first few years of her life she was kept as a backyard breeder puppy-maker with no training. She doesn't really bay much at all. Benny (the one that bayed) had parents who both were rabbit hunters.
 

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Well in my experience our male who is the quiet one was a $70 dog from some old old people who lived out in the sticks and clearly their beagle was not engaged in anything Beagle it was just an accident pregnancy, they weren't doing any field trials or dog shows. Our female came from a man who's family has been breeding since his grandparents 50 yrs or more and she is my noisy one. His dogs are show dogs and AKC on and on. So maybe a household that just wanted to try breeding once would be a better way to go than someone who breeds them specifically for trials, shows etc..

This is a very interesting topic and one I have never thought about so I am interested myself to see what others say.
 

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tossing out another idea...

You might look for a show line that is pet quality. Show lines are not bred for the hunting instinct and might be less on the baying! Another thing to consider is a young dog that didn't make it as a show dog. Both of mine started as show dogs, but were beauty school drop-outs!! They didn't make it in the show ring. Toby was 8 months old when I got him, so the breeder was able to tell me a lot about his personality because she had spent so much time with him. Lucky was about 1 when I got him, he had been shown for longer, but developed some bad habits in the ring. But because she showed him quite a bit and traveled with him a lot, she was able to tell me a whole lot about his personality. She was spot on when she told me he was a little lover. He'd be a lap dog if I would let him!! Also, most reputable breeders take the dog back if you don't like them, so they are less likely to lie to you about their personality/habits.

I would be careful of an individual getting rid of a dog. If they are getting rid of them, they may lie! LOL!
 

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The family that I got Daisy from had 2 lines. Her show line and her hunting line. Daisy is from the show line and she is a very quiet Beagle. She will bark from time to time, but she only bays when playing at doggy daycare.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Show line... interesting, it makes sense.

Our breeder emailed me a few days ago letting me know he had another litter. So I shared my concern about getting another Field Trail beagle due to the baying. I also asked him his thoughts on the issue since he's been breeding them for 40+ years.

I know we could get an older beagle and probably know what the baying tendency is in that dog if the owner, as Buffy said, is honest. But here's the thing. I think my wife and I are great dog trainers. And we like the idea of being able to mold Bodie (and a future puppy) into the type of dog we want him to be. We're all very much in synch and Bodie has responded very well to our training methods and ideology.

And I know there are a lot of rescue dogs out there that need a home, which makes me feel guilty for saying that. I'm just being honest and perhaps a little selfish in thinking that way.
 

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Duke's lines are from show dogs and he is quiet. He will bark only when he has a reason to (or thinks he has a reason, at least). Now when he does bark, he is LOUD about it, but it's very often. Violet is my noisy girl, but I have NO idea what her lines are since she's our pound puppy!

I think the field v. show is sound logic, with field being louder. Funny thing is, it's the opposite in labs. My field male was practically mute and show female was much more vocal. But with labs, they have to be quiet on the hunt so as not to scare the bird, beagles are bred to be loud on the hunt, to alert the hunters when they have a scent. Amazing how instinctual animals are!
 

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Maggie is from a show line of beagles, and she's a big time barker, beagler, and bayer/howler. My previous beagle Molly was also from a show line, and she was relatively quiet. I personally think it's a crap shoot whether or not a dog will be vocal or quiet. Good luck!
 

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yeah i'm with lil maggie its always going to come down to personality and the individual dog, talk to the breeder and meet the puppies while their still with mom, ask them to pick out the quietest pup for you, even then its not a sure thing but they'll see the pups personalities as they develop. I know some breeders who dont even let people pick they pick for them depending on how the family is and the dogs' personality. Even tho the showline/hunting line thing might slightly influence the dog its going to come down to their personality and how excitable/anxious/etc. they are.

good luck on your search.
 

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You know Brien...I think a lot has to do with how you train your dogs from the beginning in addition to their lines. The dogs we have had from puppies also happen to be the ones that don't get real vocal. Ones that have come through here as adults are the ones that have been louder and have bayed and howled. Perhaps I have just trained my dogs that barking too much or howling isn't acceptable?! (shrug) It's a thought.
 

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I agree that lineage is a factor, but for us, it was training that determined how our Sam-I-Am (@the bridge 01-10-2009) would use his big mouth.

He came from a strictly show line and, as a puppy, even before we brought him home, the breeder told us that he had a mouth on him and loved to use it. We trained him to use his voice in appropriate ways -- when he wanted to go out/come in or to speak while he was waiting to be fed. We simply corrected him and rewarded proper behavior from the beginning.

He would occasionally bark at something outside, but never just to make noise. Our neighbors/friends/acquaintences would often comment that he was such a quiet boy. People who really don't know the breed would often ask us 'aren't they loud-mouths?' and we would simply reply that you CAN teach them how to use their voice in the appropriate way.

You just have to decide who is in charge re beagling/baying/barking -- you or the pup. Just like any other behavior.
 

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I certainly don't hold it against you that you want a puppy! I do think it will be harder with a puppy to determine what tendencies it will have.

As for training, while most are not big fans of the no bark collars (electric collars - is that one in the same?), I think with a young dog not too set in its ways it might be a way to pretty quickly reduce barking tendencies. I hope no one thinks I am mean for saying that! I think those require a smart, understanding trainer, which you clearly seem to be! I have never used one and have no clue as to the results - I am strictly tossing it out as an idea! While I would never want to completely change the personality of a breed, I also understand that we can't be letting our dogs bay and bark all day, too!

One other thing - don't most say that you start full on training around 6 months of age? What about trying to find a pup right at 6 months. Maybe not the ideal situation, but possibly a compromise of knowing more about its personality but right at the age to start full on training. Again, just tossing out ideas for ya!
 

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Re: A question about the Beagle breed & their line

Actually, you should start your training at 8 weeks (especially a beagle). Most training facilities however sometimes don't take dogs in until they are 6 months of age, because that is technically when the shots should be all up to date, ect. But, as my Cassidy video shows, she is only 4 months and can do more then most adult dogs now a days.
 

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Re: A question about the Beagle breed & their line

I start training my dogs from the day they get home at eight weeks.

I think there are certain instinctive traits that you will find in each breed regardless if they are working or show line.

Beagles are a noisey hound, some beagles may be less noisey than others but IMO it's not the kind of thing that you can try to avoid. If the beagle you have now is noisey he will probably encourage any dog you get to be noisey too.

I do drive training with my beagle, it is a very high energy style of training that gets the dog excited and pumped full of adrenaline - she came from show lines and is a pedigree beagle but as soon as I say Ready to work she starts play bowing, jumping around and baying. It's just a typical beagle trait and one that you see often when the dog is 'in drive' i.e. chasing, excited, on a scent etc.
 

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Re: A question about the Beagle breed & their line

Breeding can make a difference but be aware traits can skip generations.
I had three generations of show bred Beagles and the middle one was the hunter.
He started to bay on his first walk out at 12 weeks old and continued for the rest of his life.He would give Tongue on every scent he found no matter what it was,even if it was just somebody walking ahead of us.
Also if your present hound gives Tongue you may well find that the new addition will join in as that is what hounds do.
 

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maybe you could look at different breeders and see what they have? when i went to get sophie, all her bros and sisters came up to great me with great enthusiasm, and so did her parents, cousins, etc. however, not one of them made a single sound, all were silent. i would suspect sophie is the way she is because of her family being that way. i know she can bay, she did do it one time, literally, <span style="text-decoration: underline">one</span> <span style="text-decoration: underline">time</span>, when she was really excited. she only barks at my tape measure. i have tried to get her to do it, just to make my wife squirm a little, but she won't.
 

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Originally Posted By: Sephlyyeah i'm with lil maggie its always going to come down to personality and the individual dog, talk to the breeder and meet the puppies while their still with mom, ask them to pick out the quietest pup for you, even then its not a sure thing but they'll see the pups personalities as they develop. I know some breeders who dont even let people pick they pick for them depending on how the family is and the dogs' personality. Even tho the showline/hunting line thing might slightly influence the dog its going to come down to their personality and how excitable/anxious/etc. they are.

good luck on your search.
This reasoning is not always true.
Dylan was homebred and was the most laid back puppy of the litter.
Until I took him for his first walk I had no idea that I had kept a very vocal boy.
But he was only vocal when out and about.He was a very quiet dog at home.
 
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