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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know someone recently posted about adding a second bagle or fostering a second beagle. I just kind of wanted to hear what people think the advantages/disadvantages are of adding another dog. Our beagle is 4 mos old and very sweet but, of course, energetic. We've been thinking of getting him a brother so he has someone to play with and help keep him busy! Also, I think he has separation anxiety. When we are gone we leave him in a crate and he drools excessively, tries to dig his way out and has been breaking his teeth trying to chew out! He gets upset if we step outside to get something out of the car; he sits at the door and whines til we come back. He also gets upset when we're separated from him even if he can see us and reach us like when we're in the shower. Sometimes I'll even leave the curtain open so he can see that I'm still there and he just sits there and whines at me till I get out! Once we get home/near him again he's totally sweet and normal. Anyway, I was thinking that maybe another dog would help him to feel like part of his pack was still there when we're gone or unavailable. What do you guys think?
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I was also wondering if you guys think an adult dog or another puppy would be better. I don't know if I can handle 2 puppies at once!!! Haha.
 

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I guess it depends on the person. I have never had 2 puppies at one time, but have added another adult to an existing pack while one was still in the puppy stage. I definitely think an adult would be a smarter choice because if you get a young pup then they may teach each other bad habits rather than an adult who might help teach your young pup some more appropriate behaviors.

One thing that I think is real important (despite whether you add another dog) is to work some on the separation anxiety of your pup. Start as if you have never tried to teach it before and put the pup in his kennel for very short sessions while you are at home. Gradually increase the times. When your pup is being quiet in the kennel, treat him. If he is misbehaving ignore him. There are many great suggestions on how to help dogs with separation anxiety on the web. I'd do some more research on it and try to continue working with your pup.
 

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Well we brought home 2 bealge sisters when they were 8 weeks old. It was a hand full in the potty training, but they were so much fun. We tried to keep some of what they did do seperate. Like when we put them in there cages they were always seperate. Sometimes for walks it was seperate.

But I would maybe try to reassure your pup before you bring another one in. If it is the start of SA, then read up and try to correct. Good Luck!!!!!!!!!
 

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I have, several times, had two puppies at once. It IS easier on the human mom with one at a time, tho having two does reduce the separation anxiety. I got Romeo then about a week later my vet's office called and said they had a little girl the owner couldn't keep, would I take her. Chloe was 3 weeks older, but less than half of Romeo's size. Princess was a youngster at that time, too, about 8 months old. The 3 of them were wonderful together. I've had people say that the pups bond with each other rather than their human, but that was not true with any of the pups I've raised together. Angel and Bella are about 11 months apart - and they are bonded - but they're also both mama's girls. Just as Joe and Jack are mama's boys. At this point Bella and Angel are now allowed to be downstairs with the big kids instead of crated when I'm gone or at night, tho they still go to their little house to eat - and often to sleep, but they're spending less of their time crated since they're growing up and Angel is calming down. She's no longer such a wild child.
Here's an article I found on Beagle Bay on Separation Anxiety. Hope it's helpful.

Dogs with separation anxiety exhibit extreme behavior problems when they are left alone. The most common behaviors are destruction of property (sometimes injuring themselves in the process), especially around doors or windows, howling and barking, and urination and defecation from distress. The destruction and house soiling is not an attempt to seek revenge on the owner for leaving, but is actually a panic response.

Separation anxiety sometimes happens when

A dog has never or rarely been left alone.
Following a long interval, such as a vacation, when dog and owner are constantly together.
After a traumatic event (in the dog's mind) such as time at a boarding kennel or shelter.
After a change in the family's routine, like a move to a new home, or a new person in the home.
Dogs that exhibit separation anxiety follow their owners around from room to room and become anxious even if a closed door separates them from the owner. They dislike spending time alone outdoors. They act depressed or anxious to your getting ready to leave the house.

For minor separation anxiety problems the following may be helpful:

Keep comings and goings low key. Ignore the dog the first few minutes when you come home, then calmly pet him.
Leave your dog with an article of clothing that has your scent on it-- one that you don't mind if it gets chewed on.
Provide enriched environment to keep the dog busy while alone. A Kong toy (even several) that is stuffed with soft food is good-- unstuffing it will occupy the dog. Hide favorite chewies in the house for the dog to find.
Sometimes leaving the radio or TV on is helpful, if the dog associates it with your presence. Or make a tape of family kitchen noise and play it while you are gone.
Provide aerobic exercise before leaving, but let the dog calm down before you leave. A tired dog will rest better.
Teach a sit or down stay (or use a tether) and gradually increase the distance you move away from your dog. Your goal is to move briefly out of sight while he remains in position. You want your dog to be comfortable about spending time apart from you.
Some dogs may be more comfortable in a crate - if the dog has first been trained to regard the crate as a safe haven. However, in many SA cases, confinement only worsens the dog's panic and hysteria.
Some dogs do better if they have a companion animal to keep them company. But this is not always successful, so be sure you actually want another pet.
Punishing a dog for destructiveness is not effective and may actually make things worse, since it could increase his anxiety.

Severe cases require systematic desensitization to being alone. This can take a long time. Sometimes veterinary prescribed drugs are used as a temporary measure along with the behavior modification program. Because a dog with severe separation anxiety can do damage to himself and/or your home, you may have to figure out some interim measures, such as leaving the dog at a daycare facility, or with a neighbor or family member.

Copyright © Pat Scott
 

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Thank you, Gale, we DO try
! Most of the things I post can be found on the information boards on the Bay, for those of you who are members there. We've collected a lot of very good training advice there - we're just hoping we don't lose it all when MSN closes groups in February.
 

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Just be careful if the dog has separation anxiety on its own - because if you get another dog now it may become attached to it. You might find you can't separate them without causing anxiety and that you can't take one out and leave the other at home etc. You don't want the current dog to become completely reliant on the new dog.

ETA: As per beaglesmom advice, you might want to try training the current dog to be on its own without getting anxious before introducing any new family members.
 

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We waited until Roscoe was a year old to add Cassie and we waited until Duke was a year to add Violet. Partly because 2 pups are a lot of work and partly to get the first dog trained well enough that they can help train/socialize the new dog.

It worked well for us, but I do think having 2 is a wonderful thing, you just may want to give it a few months and work on your pup now (classes are a great way to do that), so you can all be ready for the new addition.
 

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We got both of ours at the same time, they were about 2yrs old. That wasn't the original plan but they had come into the shelter together and we figured we didn't want to split them up if we didn't have to. I love having two, but it was a little easier for us because they were older. Good luck!!
 

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We didn't get Dotty until Diggity was about 13 months old, Dotty was then 3 months old. Dotty has been great for Diggity and they took to each other right away. Diggity would treat her like a puppy and only use as much force as necessary to keep her in line. Is was good to see how gentle and restraining she could be especially since she and I would play pretty rough together. Now they're pretty much inseperable. The only thing I would say we had to make a point to do was make sure we always greeted Diggity first so that she didn't get jealous of the new puppy which could have led to big problems.
 

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My two are from the same litter. But when they came into our family and we already had another dog (****) who was 6. Well for some reason he took to Maggie right away. To describe her shes alot calmer or level headed. She can climb all over him and he won't let out a growl. Now Jasmine and he are a different story. Shes always submissive to him, but all he does it growl at her. She is alot more hyper than Maggie and she does like to tease him,so that could be where the problem is. Most of the time there are no problems, but like this morning jasmine got nipped by **** and I heard the yelp! So its something that we always have to keep aware of with the two of them. There have been a few nights I did find **** and Jasmine cuddled together though...
 

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We got Boomer from a breeder when he was 10 weeks old. We rescued Jersey from BREW-Midwest when Boomer was a year old, but she was about the same age anyway. It was perfect for us because in that year we bonded with Boomer and established our roles as pack leaders and solidified house breaking and other routines. Jersey is a great playmate for Boomer and I love how they keep each other entertained and occupied.

Boomer did backtrack a little in the housebreaking and it took a month or so to get both beagles completely housebroken.

I strongly recommend that you really know your first dog's personality before bringing a second dog home (i.e. if your dog is dominant alpha get a submissive dog.) Boomer is submissive for the most part so we opted for a dominate female and that has worked well.

Good luck!
 
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