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Old 08-07-2011, 12:03 AM   #1 (permalink)
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Default How are Beagles best trained?

In the persuit to learn about this breed, one of the things I want to know is the best way to train them....

Currently, I own chows, which are considered very difficult to train, but it is all in how you train them... With chows, you have to use praise and also make them think that it was all their idea. They do not do well with force training or hitting... it makes them aggressive... And they are not really treat motivated... So, it can be a time consuming effort to train a chow.. but worth it in the end. My chows are well trained, been through many classes for socializing/training, and can be trusted off leash. I do keep a back up security with a remote collar on both dogs although never need it.

So, what is the best/easiest way to train a beagle? Treat motivation? Praise? Firmness? Is a remote collar too much for a beagle?(we use ours a tone first - shock if needed - we have only had to use the shock once and at a very low setting) Do they do okay with Crate training?(mine are both crate trained and I love it!)
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Old 08-07-2011, 01:01 AM   #2 (permalink)
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FOOD.

Beagles are pigs in canine disguises, LOL! Mine will do anything for even a lousy piece of his dog food. If he's offered a high value treat like a piece of hot dog, a canine carryout treat, or well... pretty much anything, he's even more attentive. So much so that I actually have to show the treat and then clasp my hand to hide it or else he is only thinking TREAT TREAT TREAT. Praise also works well, but I've found that negativity doesn't at all. Lots of beagles are crate trained, including mine. It wasn't easy, but especially if you already know what you're doing (I didn't) you'll do fine. Many beagles are not happy to be left alone, being a pack animal, but with consistency all will be fine. Especially if there are other pets, that will help.

A friend of ours uses an electric fence w/shock collar and it works great for them. Their beagle knows where the limit is and doesn't attempt to make a break for it.

We used to have a chow when I was a kid. She was the best dog ever.
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Old 08-07-2011, 02:32 PM   #3 (permalink)
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for training a beagle use FOOD and praise. I agree with tucker they are pigs and very highly food motivated. they are very smart dogs but can also be stubborn. I personally am not a fan of shock collars or anything that can hurt the dog, you think the low setting doesnt hurt, would you wear it and find out yourself? if the answer is no then dont put it on your dog. beagles can be crate trained plenty of owners on this site have done it including myself. it is difficult but i like tucker had no clue what i was doing.
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Old 08-07-2011, 03:17 PM   #4 (permalink)
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I don't know if you mean shock collar for training purposes or for an electric fence, but I wanted to add, besides being potentially painful an electric fence may not work on every dog. I personally wouldn't bother w/my dog b/c he's so focused on rabbits (and we have them by the bushel in our neighborhood) that he'd probably run through the barrier and get shocked over and over.
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Old 08-07-2011, 03:59 PM   #5 (permalink)
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Beagles go thorough electric fences, in my opinion it's a cruelty to get them shocked again and again. Some countries banned the shock collars already, which is good.
I really don't understand what you mean by "hitting" ? Are there any people who use hitting as training?
Train beagles takes a long time, patience . My dog is two years already but I train him each and every day and I guess I will do it for a long time.
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Old 08-07-2011, 08:57 PM   #6 (permalink)
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The majority of Beagles are going to be motivated by food, but each dog is an individual. Because of this, you need to be sure to also look at what they enjoy. Bilbo is a typical Beagle; in other words, he is a pig. I use positive reinforcement and negative punishment to train my dog. Why? Because it works, and because Bilbo is way too tenacious to give a damn if you apply a correction with any sort of...anything.

Personally, I'm not a huge fan of shock collars. However, in the right hands, I do think they are a useful tool; the thing is, plenty of people fail to understand how to use them. I think, though, that unless you need them because a dog's life is in danger (i.e., I know someone that chooses to use them with her higher drive dogs, as she lost a hunting dog when it went after a deer and cut itself on barbed wire; she'd much rather have that tool for back up than risk another fatality), they should be used as a last resort sort of tool.

As for crate training...yes, a Beagle can be crate trained, and like you, I love having mine crate trained!

ANYHOW, from what I'm heard, the typical Beagle is similar to your Chows, in the sense that they need to think it was their idea. That, or you need to make it clear that them performing the desired behavior gets them something delicious/desired.
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Old 08-08-2011, 01:23 AM   #7 (permalink)
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We have a fully fenced large backyard and large deck, plus the dogs come in and out as they please for the most part. My chows are crate trained at night and for car rides. I am a photographer, and so kind of work from home/on my own terms, and since I work for myself, I can make my own hours. Plus I do alot of animal shoots which means I can take the dog with me on alot of occasions, so being home alone is not a huge issue for my animal.
The reason we use the remote shock collar is because we also own property down by the lake, about two acres, but it is fairly close to a highway. We go camping for anywhere from 3-10 days and it is just not fair to keep the dogs on tie outs the whole time. My dogs have really great recalls, but I use the shock collars for extra security... I have only had to use it once. A deer came right up to our site and startled them and they took off after it. Right towards the highway. I did the tone first and they slowed down, looked back and then continued after the deer, I gave the minimum shock and they both stopped... sat down and watched the deer run... and then came running back to me, tails wagging and full ready to tell me about their adventure!

I also HAVE tested the collar on myself and my husband did it to himself also. I would never use any type of training device without testing it on myself. Why I chose this particular one is because the shock is a very last resort, most of the time they come back with just hearing the tone...

I LOVE food motivated dogs! Neither of my chows are at all. They are praise only. I have tried everything.... and it doesn't work... they just want some lovin' and head pats... lol

kutyuska, what I meant by hitting was as punishment... We don't use it, but my sister will smack her dog on the butt or side if she doesn't listen. I have tried to teach her different ways to train her, but she is set that she knows what is best for her dog. Unfortunately, her dog is starting to act out worse now....

I am pretty good with stubborn dogs and "la la la I can't hear you" attitudes... so that part sounds doable to me! I am loving that they are food motivated. I am not worried about digging, don't mind howling/baying/barking.... Chewing would be an issue but I think that is going to have to be a matter of training/prevention.... I am loving the size and definitely love the grooming!! (Compare grooming a beagle to two chows and they are nothing!) So, it sounds like this might be a good breed for us to get into when my chows are gone.... Is there any other bad habits that a potential owner should know about or at least possibly expect???
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Old 08-08-2011, 02:07 PM   #8 (permalink)
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Dog Training Without Electric Shock Collars - Whole Dog Journal Article

Say No to Shock Collars

Whole Dog Journal - Search Results

The way you train a beagle is the same with any dog. You start with positive training, setting up for good behavior. redirection on bad behavior, ignoring bad behavior. Food, praise, hunt/senting walks as rewards. Excersie their mind, get their energy out then do several smaller training sessions during the day.

Clicker training works well.
What Is Clicker Training? | Karen Pryor Clickertraining

An Introduction to Clicker Training | ClickFlicks Learning Center
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Old 01-08-2013, 03:43 PM   #9 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Darren View Post
for training a beagle use FOOD and praise. I agree with tucker they are pigs and very highly food motivated. they are very smart dogs but can also be stubborn. I personally am not a fan of shock collars or anything that can hurt the dog, you think the low setting doesnt hurt, would you wear it and find out yourself? if the answer is no then dont put it on your dog. beagles can be crate trained plenty of owners on this site have done it including myself. it is difficult but i like tucker had no clue what i was doing.
i tried it on my neck, it is rather annoying and can see how it would alter behavior....we are using the collar, its a learning process, but yogi is getting better with chewing....just be careful and i would recommend using it for one behavior...timing is key, and dont leave it on in your pocket and lean over the counter! yogi got a nice treat for that one lol...we also use positive reinforcement with food and lots of love!
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Old 01-08-2013, 05:21 PM   #10 (permalink)
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Best way to train is..... Plenty of patience! lol. Food is a must. Rascal is a little pig even grunts like one!
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